Northern High Spanish Honors Society tutors elementary students


Being able to share a bond with others who enjoy speaking Spanish is a privilege.

Junior Bianca Decatur explains the Spanish term for “eye” to second grader Morgan McAuley. Courtesy of The Round Table

Junior Bianca Decatur explains the Spanish term for “eye” to second grader Morgan McAuley.
(Photo courtesy of The Round Table)

It is also nice to have the honor completing senior year with cords at graduation.

The requirements for National Spanish Honor Society are a 3.0 GPA or higher in Spanish I and II and being able to attend all the meetings and community service requirements in Durham.

A 2013 Northern High School graduate founded Northern’s chapter of the National Spanish Honors Society last year.

“Last year, Brooke Benson initiated the process and asked if Sherrod Laws and I would be the advisors,” Spanish teacher Collin Brown said.

Students in the Honors Society this year have to earn their cords by getting community service hours. This year, students volunteer at Little River Elementary School every Wednesday with Judith Collier’s second grade class.

Students, as well as kids in the elementary school, practice Spanish skills.

“One of the ways to master the material in the subject is to teach it,” Brown said.

Students at Northern appreciate being able to share a special bond with the younger generation.

“The kids are so funny and outgoing. I enjoy going and they enjoy us coming as well,” senior Tierra Fuller said.

The love that students receive from the kids at Little River creates joy in their lives.

Junior Molly Monsees helps Little River second grader Jackson Tilley learn Spanish body parts.

Junior Molly Monsees helps Little River second grader Jackson Tilley learn Spanish body parts.

“I love seeing the kids faces,” senior Alexis Walker said. “How excited they get to see us come makes my day.”

The members of the Honors Society teach the children a variety of Spanish words, such as colors, animals, family titles, the alphabet and foods to increase the children’s Spanish vocabulary.

“We teach them basic words so they can understand the material in a learnable manner,” treasurer Stacey Price said.

The children learn material that they can apply to their every day lives.

“We sit down and strategize words that they would like to know as if we were their ages,” vice president Tierra Davis said.

Students said memories of working with the kids are unforgettable.

“This one boy told me he has an aunt named Tierra, and he will always remember my name, which made me so happy inside to think I can impact someone little’s life,” Fuller said.

A lot of the children remember the information by practicing Spanish outside of the classroom.

“The most amazing thing is how optimistic the kids are and that they actually remember everything we teach them,” Davis said. “When it’s time for review, the kids are anxious to move on to other words because they are so smart.”

 

Brittany is a student journalist writing for her high school newspaper, the Round Table, of Northern High School.